Capillary Electrochromatography and Pressurized Flow
Capillary Electrochromatography: An Introduction

Ira S. Krull, Robert L. Stevenson, and Kavita Mistry, with Michael E. Swartz

$79.95
Discounts on bulk purchases.

May 2000
240 pp.
Illustrated
ISBN: 980-9828874-1-7

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缯span> Contents

1. Introduction
1.1 Some definitions and concepts
1.2 Capillary electrochromatography: the best of both worlds
1.3 Reproducibility
1.4 Selection of operating mode
1.5 Pressure-assisted CEC
1.6 Advantages of CEC
1.7 Limitations of CEC
Appendix: Symbols and units used in CEC
References

2. Capillary Column Technology
2.1 Packed Capillaries
2.2 Surface chemistry on particles
2.3 Techniques for packing capillaries
2.4 Packing protocols
2.5 Continuous beds or monoliths in CEC
2.6 Open tubular capillaries
2.7 Conclusions and prognostications
References

3. The Mobile Phase
3.1 Bubble prevention
3.2 Effect of organic solvents
References

4. Instrumentation
4.1 General instrumentation
4.2 Capillary columns
4.3 Detection
4.4 Microchips
4.5 Future developments
References

5. Applications for Small Molecules
5.1 Biomolecules and biopharmaceuticals
5.2 Pharmaceuticals and related analytes
5.3 Drugs of abuse
5.4 Ion analysis
5.5 Amino acids
5.6 Enantiomeric separations
5.7 Conclusions
References

6. Applications for Biopolymers
6.1 Potential of CEC
6.2 Stationary phase and packing considerations
6.3 Carbohydrates
6.4 Peptides, proteins, and antibodies
6.5 Nucleic acids and oligonucleotides
6.6 Biopolymer adsorption and interaction
6.7 Conclusions
References

7. Method Transfer from HPLC
7.1 Differences Between CEC and PEC in Method Transfer from HPLC
7.2 Comparison of Basic requirements in CEC and HPLC
7.3 Packings and stationary phases in CEC
7.4 Mobile phases and buffers in CEC
7.5 Sample preparation requirements
7.6 Isocratic, step-gradient, and true gradient conditions
7.7 Detector conditions
7.8 Voltage conditions
References
Further reading

8. Method Development and Optimization
8.1 Analytical method requirements
8.2 Analyte standard characterization
8.3 Literature search, background information, and prior art
8.4 Adaptability and choice of possible methods
8.5 Instrumentation preparation and initial studies
8.6 Sample and method optimization
8.7 Demonstration of analytical figures of merit with standards and system suitability samples
8.8 Evaluation with actual samples
References
Further reading

9. Conclusions and Future Developments
9.1 Applications as the driving force for CEC
9.2 Analysis of complex samples by CEC
9.3 Specialized applications
9.4 The ideal capillary, liquid separations technique
References

Glossary

Index

缯span> Preface | 缯span> About the Authors

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